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Monthly Archives: February 2016

How to add a vLAN to a Cisco UCS using Unified Computing System Manager

Cisco’s UCS platform is an amazing blade infrastructure.  They are extremely reliable, very fast, and easily expanded.  Today, I’m going to briefly go over how to add a vLAN to your Cisco UCS setup, using the Cisco Unified Computing System Manager.  This guide assumes you have already configured the vLAN on your network and you have trunk-enabled ports being fed into your UCS and/or Fabric switches.

 

Go ahead and log into the Cisco UCS Manager.  Once you have logged in, select the LAN tab, then VLANs (in the left column).  Once there, click the New button, up at the top, and then Create VLANs.

 

For the VLAN Name/Prefix, give the VLAN a unique identifiable name.  In the VLAN IDs field, you need to enter to exact vLAN ID that was assigned to the vLAN when you configured it on your network infrastructure.  Once you have filled in those two fields, click OK.

 

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How to add a vLAN to VMware vSphere 5, 5.5, or 6, / ESXi virtual machine network

This is a simple step-by-step guide to adding / assigning a vLAN to a vSwitch virtual machine network on VMware ESXi and vSphere 5, 5.5, and 6.  Another way of putting it is adding a port group to a vSwitch.  It is a pretty straight forward process, but if you’ve never done it before it can be a little confusing.  We are going to create a Virtual Machine Port Group (network) that is assigned exclusively to a vLAN ID.  This guide assumes you have already created the vLAN on your switch and configured a trunk port to your virtualized infrastructure.

 

First, go ahead and log into the vSphere Client.  Once you have done so, navigate to Home > Inventory > Hosts and Clusters (if using vSphere).  If you are logging directly into an ESXi server, you should already be where you need to be immediately upon logging in.  Select your ESXi host in the left column, and then select the Configuration tab.  Once you are on the Configuration page, select Networking.  Select the Properties of the vSwitch you would like your vLAN to be assigned to.  In my case, I’m selecting the properties of vSwitch0.

 

2016-03-05 10_12_02-74.51.99.238 - vSphere Client

 

Now, we need to add a port group exclusive to the vLAN.  Click on Add.

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How to get URL rewrites & WordPress Permalinks working on Directadmin & Nginx

It’s no secret that I love using the Directadmin control panel.  The interface is very simplistic, and can be archaic at times, but it is very stable, fast, and extremely customization when using the Custombuild 2.0 scripts.  Recently, I did just that to deploy Nginx as the back-end web server, instead of the default, which is Apache.  Nginx is very fast and performs very well under heavy loads.  After migrating serenity-networks.com over, I quickly noticed that none of my links are working.  Because I use WordPress, I instantly knew it had something to do with .htaccess or permalinks.  The first thing I did was set permalinks to default, and everything started working again.  Nginx does not use, nor recognize .htaccess files, which are imperative to URL rewriting, and therefore permalinks.  So, I had to figure out how to solve this issue using configuration parameters in the Nginx.conf file.  But, this isn’t very straightforward with Directadmin.  Here is how to do it.

How to get URL rewrites and WordPress permalinks working with Directadmin, Custombuild 2.0, and Nginx:

The first thing you need to know is how Directadmin handles Nginx configuration files.  This is pretty simple.  It’s done on a per user bases, and the configuration files are located in /usr/local/directadmin/data/users/username/nginx.conf.   Pretty simple.  Each username has a folder, and within that folder is an nginx.conf file.  This is where you can set parameters per user and even drill down to a specific site for a user.  So, the first thing we will do is go to that directory, and edit the appropriate nginx.conf file for your user.

cd /usr/local/directadmin/data/users/

Look for the username for your user and cd into that directory.  If you do an ls, you will see many different files.

nginxconfdir

 

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