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How to Install OnlyOffice Document Server For Nextcloud, Fast & Easy

I’ve wasted a ridiculous amount of time trying to get the Collabora / LibreOffice / CODE platform integrated with my Nextcloud 11 server.  I wanted to have Google Docs-style editing, but it was turning out to be a massive headache.  One day, on accident, I stumbled on an OnlyOffice plugin for OwnCloud.  After a little digging, I found out it worked with NextCloud as well.  Less than 15 minutes later, I had the OnlyOffice Document Server packages installed on a second Ubuntu 16.04 server and it was fully integrated with my NextCloud server.

 

What You Need

 

For this guide, you will ultimately need the following:

  • A 2nd Ubuntu 16.04 or 16.10 Server
  • A Valid SSL Certificate (A FREE LetsEncrypt Certificate Will Do)
  • A Valid DNS Entry for Both Servers (for this guide, you are required to use onlyoffice.yourdomain.tld, custom OnlyOffice domains are out of the scope of this guide)

 

Installing Dependencies

 

OnlyOffice requires a few dependencies.  Mainly, nodejs, postgresql, and nginx.  In addition, we’ll need to enable a repo for up-to-date ttf-mscorefonts-installer packages.

 

First, let’s go ahead and add the needed repo’s.

 

echo "deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu precise main universe multiverse" | sudo tee -a /etc/apt/sources.list
curl -sL https://deb.nodesource.com/setup_6.x | sudo bash -

 

Next, install postgresql.

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Bluetooth Mouse Disconnects on Ubuntu 16.04 with Intel 7260

I came across a very aggravating problem recently on my Dell XPS 13 L321X laptop.  In the past I had used various Linux distributions on this laptop and they worked flawlessly with my Microsoft Arch Mouse.  The Arch mouse is one of just a few very newer mice that use Bluetooth LE, and I suspect that had something to do with this issue.

 

Symptoms

After installing Ubuntu 16.04, as well as Ubuntu 16.10, everything would be fine, except for the fact that my Arch mouse would simply stop working after an intermittent amount of time.  At times, it would work for a few minutes, sometimes as long as 15 minutes.  But, eventually it would just stop responding.  Powering the mouse off and on did not change the behavior, and after this happened, I would be unable to turn Bluetooth off and back on again.  The Bluetooth manager would stop responding.  It would not work again until a full reboot.

 

The Solution

After trying various firmware versions for the Intel 7260 wireless combo card, and at least 4 different Linux Kernels (3.18, 4.08, 4.10, and 4.11) I found the problem appeared to be related to the TLP package.  The TLP package provides advanced power management and battery savings for laptops running Linux.

Ultimately, for the time being, the fix is to disable the power management features TLP applies to to the Intel 7260 wireless card.  Do do this, first obtain the device ID of the wireless bluetooth combo card using lsusb.

Here is what it looks like on my laptop:

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How to Install Openstack Ocata on a Single Server, Using Devstack

Deploying an Openstack test or development platform can be a very daunting task.  A traditional installation of an Openstack infrastructure requires many servers and is quite complex.  However, there are a few methods that can make this task much easier, and possible with access to a single physical server or virtual machine that has enough resources.  Today, we’ll deploy an Openstack Ocata infrastructure using a single virtual machine (in my case, a VMware ESXi based virtual machine) using Devstack.  I’ve found this to be the most stable, repeatable, and reliable method to get an Openstack infrastructure up as quickly as possible.  Keep in mind, this same guide can be used to install almost any release of Openstack, simply by adjusting one word.  More on that later.

Requirements

 

For this guide, you will need a server at least as good as these specs.

  • Virtual Machine on a real hypervisor (ESXi, KVM, Xen, etc) or a bare metal server with virtualization support.
  • 14GB of RAM is the recommended minimum.  18GB or more will provide the best results.
  • 100GB of hard disk space, at least.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS server, having already ran sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade
  • About an hour and a cup of coffee.

 

Installing OpenStack

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Installing SSHPT to Automate SSH Commands & File Transfers on Multiple Hosts

SSHTP is a great little Python script that will allow you to run SSH commands or transfer files on multiple hosts with a single command.  It’s simple to use.  You simply create a hosts file with all of the remote systems you want to execute a task on, then create a file with credentials to login and run the task.  You can even configure it to be executed via a website in multiple configurations (more info on that at the bottom).

 

sshpt_command_line_window

 

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Install OpenStack on One Virtual Machine, the Easy Way, On Ubuntu 16.04 LTS!

Many of you have emailed me or posted to voice your gripes about the painful process of installing an OpenStack environment to play around with. I feel your pain! My recent article on deploying OpenStack using conjure-up worked great until a developer committed some defective code.  Some of you even reverted to my old guide on deploying OpenStack on Ubuntu 14.04 from last year.  So, I set out to give you a fool proof, 100% guaranteed deployment method that’s EASY, STABLE, and works on Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial.  Here you go!

Requirements

 

For this guide, you will need a server at least as good as these specs.

  • Virtual Machine on a real hypervisor (ESXi, KVM, Xen, etc) or a bare metal server with virtualization support.
  • 14GB of RAM is the recommended minimum.
  • 100GB of hard disk space, at least.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS server, having already ran sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade
  • About an hour and a cup of coffee.

 

Installing OpenStack

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Install OpenStack on a Single Ubuntu 16.04.1 Xenial Xerus Server Using Conjure-up

Introduction

 

It’s been some time since I wrote Installing Ubuntu OpenStack on a Single Machine, Instead of 7.  Since then, there have been many updates to both OpenStack, and Ubuntu.

This tutorial will guide you through installing OpenStack on a single Ubuntu 16.04 Server.  I will be installing Ubuntu and OpenStack within a virtual machine hosted on a VMware ESXi Hypervisor, but any fresh installation of Ubuntu 16.04 should work fine, as long as it meets the minimum requirements below.  I will be using conjure-up to install the environment due to the fact that Ubuntu’s Openstack-install package doesn’t working on Ubuntu 16.04.1 at this time.

 

Note:  I have written an updated guide on Installing OpenStack on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS using devstack.  I suggest following that guide unless you have a specific reason for using the conjure-up method.  From my experience, the devstack method requires less resources, runs faster, and performs much better once deployed.

 

Minimum Requirements

 

To install the entire environment on a single physical server or virtual machine, you will need at least:

 

  • 8 CPU’s (vCPUs will work just fine)
  • 12GB of RAM (minimum needed to successfully start everything, more is better)
  • 100GB Disk Space (SSD Prefered, but rotating disk will work)
  • Ubuntu 16.04.1 Xenial Xerus x64 Server(only OpenSSH Server installed)

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Secure Apache In No Time, For Free, With an SSL Certificate From Let’s Encrypt!

Recently, I found out about a non-profit organization called Let’s Encrypt, which came into existence earlier this year.  Let’s Encrypt is a publicly trusted certificate authority that issues FREE SSL certificates.  The SSL Certificates are fully functional and extremely easy to request and install.  In fact, using Let’s Encrypt, it only takes about a minute to request and install an SSL certificate on Apache via the Linux command line, using a few simple commands.  If you have a Linux server(s) running any sort of public facing web server, there is no reason not to do this right now.  Here’s how to do it on Ubuntu 16.04 (although it should be the same process on any version of Ubuntu)!

 

Prerequisites

To install an SSL certificate from Let’s encrypt using this guide, you will need a couple things.

  • A server running Ubuntu 16.04 (although this should work on any version of Ubuntu)
  • Apache installed with a domain name(s) that is resolvable to the IP of the server.
    • If you are hosting multiple domains, you will need to be sure you have Virtual Hosts configured that properly specify the ServerName variable.

 

Install the Let’s Encrypt Client

 

To make things easy, there is a client available, based on python, that will do all of the hard work for you.  The package is called python-letsencrypt-apache.  Let’s use Aptitude to install it.

 


#  sudo apt-get update

# sudo apt-get install python-letsencrypt-apache

 

The client is now installed and we can move on to setting up the SSL certificate.

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