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Virtualization - 4. page

Anything related to virtualization.

How To Install VMware tools on CentOS 6 and CentOS 7 / RHEL

This is a quick and dirty guide on installing VMware tools (vmtools) on a CentOS 6 or CentOS 7 virtual machine as well as RHEL (Red Hat Enterprise Linux).

First, you will need to install the VMware tools prerequisites:

[[email protected]]$  yum install make gcc kernel-devel kernel-headers glibc-headers perl net-tools

Now you will need to mount the VMware Tools ISO and select “Install/Upgrade VMware Tools” option on ESXi. This can be found a few different ways. I prefer to right click on the virtual machine, then go to guest and click on “Install/Upgrade VMware Tools.”

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Installing OpenStack on a Single CentOS 7 Server

This guide will help you install OpenStack on CentOS 7.  If you would like to install Openstack on Ubuntu, here is a guide to install OpenStack on a single Ubuntu 14.04 server, and this one will help you get OpenStack installed on a single Ubuntu 16.04 server.

I’ve always been rather curious about OpenStack and what it can and can’t do. I’ve been mingling with various virtualization platforms for many, many years. Most of my production level experience has been with VMWare but I’ve definitely seen the tremendous value and possibilities the OpenStack platform has to offer. A few days ago I came across DevStack while reading up on what it takes to get an OpenStack environment set up. DevStack is pretty awesome. Its basically a powerful script that was created to make installing OpenStack stupid easy, on a single server, for testing and development. You can install DevStack on a physical server (which I will be doing), or even a VM (virtual machine). Obviously, this is nothing remotely resembling a production ready deployment of OpenStack, but, if you want a quick and dirty environment to get your feet wet, or do some development work, this is absolutely the way to go.

The process to get DevStack up and running goes like this:

  1. Pick a Linux distribution and install it.  I’m using CentOS7.
  2. Download DevStack and do a basic configuration.
  3. Kick of the install and grab a cup of coffee.

A few minutes later you will have a ready-to-go OpenStack infrastructure to play with.

Server Setup and Specs

I have always been fond of CentOS and it is always my go-to OS of choice for servers, so that is what I’m going to use here. CentOS version 7 to be exact. Just so you know, DevStack works on Ubuntu 14.04 (Trusty), Fedora 20, and CentOS/RHEL 7. The setup is pretty much the same for all three so if you’re using one of the other supported OS’s, you should be able to follow along without issues, but YMMV.

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Expanding & Resizing an LVS Partition / Group on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

I have a server dedicated to the purpose of hosting an ownCloud instance. OwnCloud 8 to be exact. It’s an Ubuntu 14.04 LTS virtual machine, on an ESXi 5 hypervisor. This is my own server, and not any sort of revenue generating customer service. It has become a “Dropbox” replacement for myself, and a few select friends and family. Recently, I found the original 1TB I allocated to be filling up quickly. So, I started doing some google searches to see how I could go about resizing, or expanding, an LVM group (like a partition). I found an enormous wealth of information, much of it conflicting. As I started going through a guide, that closely matched my configuration (everything was the same, actually, except the size of the disk), I instantly faced problems with commands not working. It was frustrating. Eventually I navigated through it and successfully expanded the Logical Volume. I figured I would go ahead and document my troubles so that I can make others lives a little easier.

Firstly, you need to run a couple commands to see what you’re working with. These commands are df and fdisk -l. You should see something like this:

[email protected]:~$ df
Filesystem                  1K-blocks     Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/cloud--vg-root 1048254140 65112056 929870740   7% /
none                                4        0         4   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
udev                          4077252        4   4077248   1% /dev
tmpfs                          817700      524    817176   1% /run
none                             5120        0      5120   0% /run/lock
none                          4088496        0   4088496   0% /run/shm
none                           102400        0    102400   0% /run/user
/dev/sda1                      240972    67164    161367  30% /boot


[email protected]:~$ sudo fdisk -l
[sudo] password for mike:

Disk /dev/sda: 1099.5 GB, 1099511627776 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 133674 cylinders, total 2147483648 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x000c9595

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1   *        2048      499711      248832   83  Linux
/dev/sda2          501758  2147481599  1073489921    5  Extended
/dev/sda5          501760  2147481599  1073489920   8e  Linux LVM

Disk /dev/mapper/cloud--vg-root: 1090.7 GB, 1090661646336 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 132598 cylinders, total 2130198528 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/mapper/cloud--vg-root doesn't contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/mapper/cloud--vg-swap_1: 8589 MB, 8589934592 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 1044 cylinders, total 16777216 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

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Installing Proxmox VE 3 from a USB Thumb Drive

I recently decided to venture into the Proxmox virtualization world. Being a VCP, i’ve always used VMWare based virtualization for just about everything. I have played around with Xen before, but most all of my virtualization endevours have been purely hypervisor “bare-metal” based. When I found out the Proxmox seems to be the best of both worlds, with hypervisor and container based virtualization in one package, I was intrigued. So, I looked for a quick how-to on creating a bootable thumbdrive to install Proxmox (I don’t have a CD drive on the server, nor any of my servers now that I think about it). I’m using OSX as my primary OS, so I was happy to find that the .ISO could be copied to a USB thumbdrive with one simple command (works on OSX and Linux):

dd if=pve-cd.iso of=/dev/XYZ bs=1M

I plugged in an 8GB USB thumbdrive and needed to figure out what the /dev/ device name was, so I could format the command properly. So, google search it was. I felt pretty stupid when I found out that running this single command, would give me the info I needed:

$ mount

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Tons and tons of awesome links

I always come across pages, links, and things that I don’t want to forget about, and I want to share with the world. So, I decided to create a post with nothing but links. From time to time I will update this post with new links. I’ve tried to categorize everything as much as possible. Be sure to hit the break below to get the full list. Enjoy!

Web Development – Coding, Design, Templates, Etc.

HTML5 Boilerplate – HTML5 Front-End Template  –  http://html5boilerplate.com/

Initializr – HTML5 Template Generator (Based on Biolerplate)  –  http://www.initializr.com/

Smashing Magazine Freebie Icons  –  http://www.smashingmagazine.com/tag/icons/

1001 Free Fonts  –  http://www.1001freefonts.com/

 

Web Hosting – Control Panels, Web Servers, Modules, Etc.

Kloxo – Fully featured hosting control panel (like directadmin/cpanel)  –  http://lxcenter.org/software/kloxo/

ZPanelCP – Fully featured hosting control panel that supports linux as well as Windows (LAMP)  –  http://www.zpanelcp.com/about/

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