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centos 7

How to install GlusterFS + NFS on CentOS 7 for Virtual Machine Storage

GlusterFS is one of the fastest growing Open Source storage platforms in existence. It’s very simple to install, scale, and manage. What makes Gluster so amazing, is its ability to scale and replicate. It really sets the bar for software defined storage systems. It runs on whitebox hardware, or virtual machines. Lately, I’ve come across quite a few people that seem to be scared of Gluster and don’t know where to begin. I am here to help! Today, we’re going to install and configure GlusterFS on a CentOS 7 virtual machine; and, we’re going to make it NFS accessible for VM storage. Every hypervisor in existence supports NFS storage for virtual machines, including VMware ESXi / vSphere, Proxmox, Xen, KVM, oVirt, OpenStack, and all the others.

Installing GlusterFS Server and Client on CentOS 7 (two nodes)

I am using two virtual machines, each running CentOS 7. Their hostnames are gfs1 and gfs2. I have added a 40GB second disk to each VM that will be dedicated to GlusterFS. I suggest you have an identically sized second partition or drive on each of your systems as well.

As always, after connecting via SSH or console, go ahead and make sure everything is updated and upgraded on both nodes.

yum -y update

And, let’s go ahead and install a few useful packages (both nodes).

yum -y install nano net-tools wget

Edit the hosts file on both nodes. Make sure both nodes can resolve to each other via hostname.

nano /etc/hosts

Screen Shot 2015-06-03 at 1.44.35 PM

Now we can download and install Gluster (both nodes).

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How To Disable Firewalld and Get Old School IPTables Back In CentOS 7 and RHEL 7

When CentOS 7 was released, it was quickly obvious that CentOS and Red Hat had switched over to firewalld for its firewall control. Although its syntax is a bit easier to work with than iptables, some software out there has issues with it, such as Docker. Some just prefer to stick with the standard iptables syntax because it is what they know and what they are comfortable with. So, if you have CentOS 7 or RHEL 7 installed and want the old iptables back, this guide is for you.

First thing’s first, disable firewalld

#  systemctl mask firewalld

Now, lets stop firewalld

#  systemctl stop firewalld

It would be a good idea to go ahead and make sure that firewalld is masked and inactive, so lets do just that.

#  systemctl status firewalld

firewalld.service
   Loaded: masked (/dev/null)
   Active: inactive (dead)

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How to Install Docker on CentOS 7 and Set Up A Ghost Blog

Docker is a slick container based virtualization platform that allows you to run “images,” with minimal overhead. There are many different images available, from full blown OS’s, such as Ubuntu or CentOS, to web apps like WordPress or Ghost. The possibilities are endless, and because resource usage is minimal, you can really do a lot with little resources. You can install docker on all of the major linux distributions, as well as windows. I works fine in a virtual machine, or VPS. I will be installing Docker on a CentOS 7 VM, running on an ESXi hypervisor.

Lets Get Started

I’m assuming you already have your operating system installed, you are sitting at a command prompt. Installation and configuration is very easy on CentOS 7. By default, CentOS uses firewalld. Docker and firewalld do not get along nicely. Docker creates iptables rules directly for access to running containers, and if firewalld is refreshed or restarted, all of the iptables rules docker initiated get wiped by firewalld. So, we will disable firewalld and install the classic iptables functionality. Here are the steps involved:

  • Install Docker
  • Disable firewalld
  • Install iptables configuration scripts
  • Download Ghost Docker image and run

First, we will go ahead and install Docker. To do this only requires a single, simple command.

#  sudo yum install docker

Let’s set up Docker to start at boot time.

#  sudo chkconfig docker on

There will be a handful of dependencies, nothing out of the ordinary. If you are already running as root, you can omit the sudo. Next, we need to get firewalld stopped, removed, and iptables configuration scripts installed.

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