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Install OpenStack on One Virtual Machine, the Easy Way, On Ubuntu 16.04 LTS!

Many of you have emailed me or posted to voice your gripes about the painful process of installing an OpenStack environment to play around with. I feel your pain! My recent article on deploying OpenStack using conjure-up worked great until a developer committed some defective code.  Some of you even reverted to my old guide on deploying OpenStack on Ubuntu 14.04 from last year.  So, I set out to give you a fool proof, 100% guaranteed deployment method that’s EASY, STABLE, and works on Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial.  Here you go!

Requirements

 

For this guide, you will need a server at least as good as these specs.

  • Virtual Machine on a real hypervisor (ESXi, KVM, Xen, etc) or a bare metal server with virtualization support.
  • 14GB of RAM is the recommended minimum.
  • 100GB of hard disk space, at least.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS server, having already ran sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade
  • About an hour and a cup of coffee.

 

Installing OpenStack

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Configuring ownCloud 9 & Active Directory / LDAP Plugin Successfully

With this step-by-step guide, you will have your ownCloud 9 (and earlier) cloud server authenticating against Active Directory or LDAP correctly in no time!

Introduction

 

Recently, I went through the process of setting up a brand new ownCloud 9.1 server, after my previous ownCloud server had seen upgrades from 6.x all the way up to 8x.  If you’ve used ownCloud that long, you know the abundant changes and improvements that have been made along the way did not come without their growth pains; especially if you delved into encryption.  So, I decided to start fresh.  I use Active Directory to provide a centralized authentication source for everything in my personal “cloud,” so after setting up my new Dropbox clone, the first thing I needed to do was configure the LDAP user and group backend plugin.  I had a lot of problems getting the Active Directory usernames to match the ownCloud usernames, instead of showing a long string off numbers.  It was a lot of confusing UID, UUID, SAMAccountName and DN related confusion.  There aren’t any great guides to keep you from getting a headache, so I decided to make one.

 

Problems with the LDAP user and group backend plugin

 

It’s pretty straight forward to get an ownCloud server authenticating against and Active Directory server, but the biggest problem I’ve seen is the mapped usernames end up being long strings of numbers in ownCloud.  Although the display names are correct in owncloud, the actual username for all AD mapped logins, by default, are a long unique string makes things difficult.  For one, if you need to get to a users ownCloud data folder, there’s no intuitive way of knowing who’s is who’s folder from the command line.

With this step-by-step guide, you will have your ownCloud server authenticating against Active Directory / LDAP, with the following benefits:

 

  • The ownCloud username will match the Active Directory / LDAP username (no long incomprehensible string of numbers)
  • Any user added to a specified group created in Active Directory will automatically have ownCloud login privileges.
  • ownCloud users will be able to login using their username or email address (if specified in AD) interchangeably.

These three pluses make everything very seemless and saves a lot of headaches. So, lets get started.

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How-To Install ownCloud 9 / 9.1 / 9.x on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS for the ULTIMATE, Private, Dropbox Clone

Introduction

 

Let’s face it, since the advent of Dropbox, Box, Google Drive and the bazillion other cloud-based file synchronization platforms that have came into existence over the past decade, it’s almost a necessity. For the road warrior, using multiple devices, or even the traditional white-collar worker, having access to all of your files no matter what device you’re using is extremely convenient and adds an enormous productivity boost to our lives. One of my biggest concerns with all of the third-party services, however, is privacy and security. Allowing another entity to store my sensitive data, and trusting they will keep in secure, is pretty scary. Thankfully, there are many options to roll-your-own cloud file synchronization and it really doesn’t take much horsepower on the server side. With a low cost VPS (virtual private server), retired computer at home, or even a $25 RaspberryPi, you can easily build your own Dropbox clone that will put you in control of your own data. Today, I’ll walk you through setting up ownCloud 9.1 on Cannocial’s Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. I will be setting up my cloud on a virtual machine running on VMware ESXi, but the process is very similar no matter what hardware platform you choose. This step-by-step guide assumes you have a plain, unmodified, minimum installation of Ubuntu Server 16.04 LTS, with only SSH access. If you don’t have SSH running, or don’t want to enable it, console access will work just fine. So, lets get started!

 

Installing Prerequisites (Apache/MySQL/PHP)

 

Go ahead and login to your freshly installed Ubuntu 16.04 server.  Be sure to login with a username that has sudoer privileges.  This can be the username you selected during installation or specified when you provisioned your VPS.  Let’s make sure everything is up-to-date before going any further. We will use Aptitude to do so.

 

#  sudo apt-get update

#  sudo apt-get upgrade -y

 

Now we can jump in to the nitty gritty.  There are a few standard prerequisites needed for ownCloud to run.  Most people refer to this as the LAMP stack (short for Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP).

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BYOC Series #1 – How to install Pydio on Ubuntu 14.04 – Your own private Dropbox clone

This is the first post in the “Build Your Own Cloud” series (BYOC) of guides. Each BYOC post will help you build the foundation of your own personal, private cloud. Today I’m setting my sights on Pydio. Pydio is an Open Source platform that mimics the functionality of Dropbox. There are a few Open Source Dropbox-clones out there, including OwnCloud, which I’ve written about in the past. Pydio is definitely more visually aesthetic than OwnCloud, and quite possibly even Dropbox. It’s also packed full of features. Some of Pydio’s key features include the following.

  • File Sharing – Web UI, Desktop Sync Client, & Mobile Apps
  • Web Access – Drag and drop files from your desktop, view & edit files online
  • Mobile Access – Native Android and iOS apps for phones and tablets
  • Flexible Backend Storage – Works with AWS, OpenStack, Samba, FTP, and even Dropbox
  • Directory Authentication – Will authenticate against LDAP, Active Directory, WordPress, Drupal, Google, and more
  • Very Secure – Supports Encryption as well as File & Folder ACLs
  • Compatible Platform – PHP-based & runs on LAMP or Windows IIS

It’s powerful enough to do everything Dropbox does, but you maintain control of your own data and personal information. You don’t have to pay a monthly fee to get large amounts of storage for you, or your company or even your family. Let’s get started.

Installing Pydio on Ubuntu 14.04

I’m installing Pydio on a virtual machine running Ubuntu 14.04, minimal server installation, with OpenSSH server running. First things first, let’s make sure everything is updated and upgraded.

#  sudo apt-get -y update
#  sudo apt-get -y upgrade

We need to add the debian package sources for Pydio to sources.list.

#  sudo nano /etc/apt/sources.list

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