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Install OpenStack on One Virtual Machine, the Easy Way, On Ubuntu 16.04 LTS!

Many of you have emailed me or posted to voice your gripes about the painful process of installing an OpenStack environment to play around with. I feel your pain! My recent article on deploying OpenStack using conjure-up worked great until a developer committed some defective code.  Some of you even reverted to my old guide on deploying OpenStack on Ubuntu 14.04 from last year.  So, I set out to give you a fool proof, 100% guaranteed deployment method that’s EASY, STABLE, and works on Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial.  Here you go!

Requirements

 

For this guide, you will need a server at least as good as these specs.

  • Virtual Machine on a real hypervisor (ESXi, KVM, Xen, etc) or a bare metal server with virtualization support.
  • 14GB of RAM is the recommended minimum.
  • 100GB of hard disk space, at least.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS server, having already ran sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade
  • About an hour and a cup of coffee.

 

Installing OpenStack

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How to setup oVirt 3.4 virtualization on CentOS 6.6

oVirt, in my opinion, is the biggest contender with VMware vSphere. oVirt has the weight and development resources of Red Hat behind it, which has undoubtedly slingshotted it ahead of the rest of the open source virtualization solutions out there. It has almost all of the “out of the box” features vSphere has, and it works extremely well.

There have been two major holdback concerning oVirt in the past. First, early on it only supported Fedora. This definitely scared many people away, myself included. That is no longer the case as it now supports Fedora, RHEL, and CentOS. The second major drawback is the complexity of installation. Overall the methodology is pretty simple. At a minimum, you need two machines. An oVirt Engine, which is the brains of the operation and powers the web interface, and you have the oVirt Node, which is the “hypervisor.” Although the overall methodology is simple enough, it can really be a pain to install and get working. But, that’s improving as well.

I wrote this guide to help you get your oVirt infrastructure built on CentOS 6.6 easily, and quickly. You will need two servers, at minimum. The good news is that one of them, the oVirt Engine, can be virtualized, running on your currently configured hypervisor of choice. As far as specs, you’ll want to try to be close to the following.

oVirt Engine Minimum Server Specs (can be virtual or physical machine)

  • CentOS 6.6 x64
  • 4 CPU Cores
  • 4GB Memory
  • 25 GB Hard Disk Space

oVirt Hypervisor Node (must be on physical machine)

  • oVirt Node 3.4 ISO installed as OS
  • 4 CPU Cores
  • 6GB Memory
  • 40GB Hard Disk (or iSCSI / NFS storage available)

This is enough to work with and get a good idea of what the oVirt platform is capable of. It’s also a solid foundation that can be grown and expanded on to form a production worthy infrastructure. So, lets get started.

How to build an oVirt infrastructure on CentOS 6.6

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How to install OMD (Open Monitoring Distribution) on Ubuntu 14.04

Open Monitoring Distribution (OMD) is an Open Source network, server, and datacenter monitoring platform and it’s absolutely fantastic. It’s basically a bunch of different monitoring systems all pooled into one platform. My favorite part of OMD is that it includes Check_MK, which I think is the best monitoring interface out there. But, it’s a lot more than that. Here is a breif list of what OMD contains (there’s more than this).

  • Nagios
  • Icinga
  • Shinken
  • Check_MK
  • Multisite
  • DokuWiki
  • NagVis
  • pnp4nagios
  • rrdtool

That’s just a brief list of all the greatness that’s packaged into OMD. Every network and home lab should have an OMD installation running on a virtual machine to keep tabs on everything and alert you when something goes wrong. Today, I’ll be installing and configuring OMD on an Ubuntu 14.04 virtual machine. So, lets get started already.

Installing OMD on Ubuntu 14.04

I always like to make sure everything is updated and upgraded when I’m setting up a new server. So lets go ahead and do that.

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get -y upgrade

Now we can get to work installing OMD. Fortunately, there are OMD packages already made for some of the more popular Linux distributions, Ubuntu 14.04 included. You can see all of the available packages by clicking on this link. As of this writing, OMD version 1.20 is the latest so that’s what I’m going to install. Check and see what the latest version is before getting started.

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How To Add Windows Install Images To WDS (Windows Deployment Services) On Server 2012 R2

If you read my post on “How To Install WDS (Windows Deployment Services) on Windows Server 2012 R2.” you might be at a point where you have a WDS server set up, but you don’t have any Windows images loaded to install anything. Or, you might be having issues adding images to your WDS server. Either way, I’m here to help.

How to add images to WDS

Open up Windows Deployment Services by selecting it from the Tools menu on Server Management.

Screen Shot 2015-05-25 at 8.30.25 PM

If you have an ISO for Windows 7, Windows 8, Server 2008, or Server 2012, you’ll want to extract it using a tool like WinRAR, and move it over to your WDS server or make sure it’s available via a network share. If you are using a physical server and you have a CD ROM, you can put the OS installation CD in the drive as an alternative if you like. I prefer working with images.

There are two files we will need to add your first image. These are.

  • boot.wim – this is the Windows boot image
  • install.wim – this is the actual installation image

Click Here To Read The Entire Post!!

How To Install WDS (Windows Deployment Services) on Windows Server 2012 R2

This is the first in a three part series on “The Ultimate PXE Server Configuration.” PXE is the protocol that your network card can use to boot from the network. Having a good PXE server is a major need on every decently sized network or home lab. It’s really nice to never have to scrounge for a USB thumb drive or accumulate piles of burnt CDs that are only used once. All of those headaches can be avoided with a properly configured PXE server.

Microsoft Windows Server 2008 and 2012 both include what’s called WDS. This stands for Windows Deployment Services. This is a network boot (PXE) environment that allows you to install all sorts of different Windows versions, all over the network. A network install of Windows 7 or 8 over a gigabit network takes just a few minutes. It’s insanely fast.

In the Linux world, the defacto standard for PXE is the SysLinux package. It’s excellent for installing various Linux distributions, hypervisors (like vmware and xen), and tools (such as gparted, AV software, and disc cloning utilities). It even supports Windows installations, sort of. But, it’s quite a hassle.

In a perfect world, we would just combine both of these so that we can use WDS to take care of the Windows installations, and use SysLinux to handle linux installations, tools, and everything else. Well, guess what? You can, and that’s exactly what were going to to do in this series. The first post, the one you’re reading, covers installing WDS on Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2. The second post will cover adding SysLinux to WDS. The third and final part will cover adding a ton of useful tools and installation sources. So, let’s get it started.

Installing WDS on Server 2012 R2

There are a few requirements for a WDS installation.

  • Active Directory – You need to run dcpromo on your WDS server to make it a domain controller if you don’t already have one already.
  • DHCP – It’s best to use Microsoft’s DHCP server, and like AD, I will be installing this service right along side WDS on a single server.
  • DNS – WDS needs DNS, which you will obviously have if you have a domain controller.
  • (Optional) Web Server – IIS will work well. Some packages install via http. This isn’t needed for Windows installation.
  • (Optional) NFS Server – The NFS Server role under file and storage services works well. This isn’t needed for Windows installation.

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Step By Step – Install OpenVAS 7 On CentOS 7 – Run Vulnerability Assessments and Pen Tests

Recently, I published a guide outlining how to install OpenVAS 8, from source, on Ubuntu 14. I got some feedback from some folks requesting a guide on installing OpenVAS on CentOS 7, from the binary packages available via yum. FYI, as of this writing, there are no binary packages for OpenVAS 8, hopefully they will come soon. OpenVAS is a top-knoch Open Source package for running vulnerability scans against networks and servers. Every network administration should have an OpenVAS installation tucked away on a virtual machine somewhere. It’s just so easy to monitor all of your systems for vulnerabilities, there’s no excuse not to. Installing OpenVAS from packages is much easier than installing from source. So, as requested, here you go.

How to install OpenVAS 7 on CentOS 7

Although time consuming, compared to installing from source, installing OpenVAS from binary package is a much less involved process. There are a few ‘gotchya’s” when installing to CentOS 7, mostly related to redis, which I’ll cover in this guide.

This guide assumes you have a minimal CentOS 7 server installation and you are logged into the console or via SSH.

First, we need to install a few prerequisites. To do that, run this command.

yum -y update

yum install -y wget net-tools nano

The OpenVAS binary packages aren’t included with the stock repositories. So, we need to enable the Atomicorp repository.

wget -q -O - http://www.atomicorp.com/installers/atomic |sh

yum -y upgrade

Now, we will install redis and OpenVAS 7.

yum -y install redis openvas

Click Here To View The Entire Tutorial!

How To Install OpenVAS 8 On Ubuntu 14.04 To Run Vulnerability Scans & Pen Tests

OpenVAS is one of the most amazing Open Source packages in existence. It is an Open Source fork on the Nessus Vulnerability Scanner, on steroids. If you aren’t familiar with it, let me give you a brief introduction. OpenVAS is short for Open Source Vulnerability Assessment System. it is by far the number one free network and security scanner in existence. I has a database of nearly half a MILLION exploits for nearly every operating system, web app, and device in existence, and that database is constantly being expanded and updated. Installation isn’t too bad, if you have a good guide to help you. Once installed, it’s extremely easy to use. It has a web interface that can be as easy as typing in a host name or IP address and clicking scan. Of course, you can also customize the scans and there is also a handful of pre-configured scans, some thorough, and some less thorough. Reports are generated after a scan completes, which is viewable via the web interface, or you can even generate a PDF report that is useful for a network administrator, as well as upper management, if needed. There are software packages in existence that cost tens of thousands of dollars and fall short of OpenVAS’s feature set. Now that you have a brief introduction to OpenVAS, let’s get started on installing it.

How to install OpenVAS 8 on Ubuntu 14.04

OpenVAS has packages for CentOS and RedHat, which makes it very easy to install on those platforms. It only requires a few yum commands. Unfortunately, they do not have packages for Ubuntu. However, it’s not that hard to install. I’m assuming you have done a minimal installations of Ubuntu 14.04 Server, with only the OpenSSH Server packages installed.

First, we need to get some dependencies installed.

sudo apt-get install -y build-essential devscripts dpatch libassuan-dev \
 libglib2.0-dev libgpgme11-dev libpcre3-dev libpth-dev libwrap0-dev libgmp-dev libgmp3-dev \
 libgpgme11-dev libopenvas2 libpcre3-dev libpth-dev quilt cmake pkg-config \
 libssh-dev libglib2.0-dev libpcap-dev libgpgme11-dev uuid-dev bison libksba-dev \
 doxygen sqlfairy xmltoman sqlite3 libsqlite3-dev wamerican redis-server libhiredis-dev libsnmp-dev \
 libmicrohttpd-dev libxml2-dev libxslt1-dev xsltproc libssh2-1-dev libldap2-dev autoconf nmap libgnutls-dev \
libpopt-dev heimdal-dev heimdal-multidev libpopt-dev mingw32

For the sake of making this as easy as possible, lets go ahead and become root for the installation.

sudo su

OpenVAS default installation settings requires a quick fix for redis-server.

Click Here To Read The Entire Tutorial!