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How To Install VMware VMtools (VMware Tools) on Ubuntu Linux

So, you need to install vmtools on Ubuntu. You’ve come to the right place. I’ve done it hundreds of times, but recently a friend of mine was having some difficulty doing this. I thought I would put a quick how-to together so I could maybe help some more people out. Here goes.

How To Install VMtools on Ubuntu

First thing’s first. Before going any further, I suggest you update apt, and then upgrade. This will make sure everything is up to date on your virtual machine.

#  sudo apt-get -y update

#  sudo apt-get -y upgrade

Now, you need to attach the VMware tools installation disc to your virtual machine. In ESXi / vSphere, just right click on the virtual machine, in the left pane, go to Guest, then select “Install/Upgrade VMware Tools.” Like this.

Screen Shot 2015-05-17 at 3.43.46 PM

If you are using VMware Workstation, or VMware Fusion, select the virtual machine in the library, then under the Virtual Machine pull down menu at the top, select “Install VMware Tools.” In VMware Fusion, it looks like this.

Click Here To Read The Entire Tutorial!

How To Install & Configure Fail2Ban On Ubuntu 14.04 LTS To Block Brute Force Attacks Against SSH and Apache Web Server

As you’ve probably heard me say before, if you have a public facing Linux server, meaning one or more open or forwarded ports, Fail2Ban absolutely must be installed. Fail2Ban monitors log files for excessive login attempts, also called Brute Force attacks. They are extremely common place on the internet. I have never had a public facing server that has gone more than a few days without some hacker trying to brute force it. These attacks go like this. Someone writes a script, or uses a program, that reads a bunch of possible usernames from a text file that has nothing but millions of usernames. There is also a text file with millions of passwords. The script will attempt to go through all username and password combinations until it finds one that can login successfully. Obviously, if you get a hundred or more login attempts from one IP address, nothing good will ever come from that IP so it pretty safe to assume it should be blocked, at least for some period of time.

Fail2Ban does precisely this. It constantly watches any log file you tell it to watch, and when a certain number of login attempts are logged from an IP address, Fail2Ban will automatically create an iptables rule to block all traffic from that IP address for a given period of time. Because brute force attacks take a long, long time, blocking one early on pretty much eliminates the possibility of a successful attack. SSH is the most common service / port for brute force attacks, from my experience. With FTP and POP3 (email) coming in second and third. It’s a no-brainer to set up Fail2Ban to automatically block attacks. It gives you much needed protection and security for your servers. So, here we go.

How to Install Fail2Ban on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty)

First and foremost, let’s make sure apt is updated.

#  sudo apt-get update

Now we can install Fail2Ban. Since there is an aptitude package already, we will use that to install.

#  sudo apt-get install fail2ban

Surprisingly, that’s all you need to do to install it. You do, however, need to edit the main configuration file for Fail2Ban, which is jail.conf. Lets go ahead and open it up with nano and take a look.

#  sudo nano /etc/fail2ban/jail.conf

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How To Enable Data Deduplication In Windows Server 2012 On An Existing Volume

I have a very large RAID 6 array that is used to store movies, tv shows, personal files, and various other things. It’s formatted capacity is about 36TB. Believe it or not, it’s pretty much full. It currently consists of 20x2TB hard drives and I really don’t want to add any more drives to it in its current form. Later this year I’m planning on building a new array to replace it, using fewer 6TB or 8TB drives. The server that manages the array had Server 2008R2 installed. After getting down to the last few gigs of free space it dawned on me, why not install Server 2012 R2 and set up data deduplication. I’ve read some pretty impressive articles online, where people were able to reclaim up to 60% of their storage using the dedup mechanism in Server 2012. So, I went ahead and upgraded. I started poking around and it wasn’t very obvious enabling dedup, so I put this guide together to help you get started.

Enabling Deduplication in Server 2012 R2

First, we need to install the Data Deduplication service. It’s part of File and Storage Services. Open Server Manager, select Local Server in the left side pane, then go to the Add Roles and Features wizard, under Manage.

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Go through the first few windows, and when you get to Server Roles, you need to make sure Data Deduplication is selected, at minimum, under File and Storage Services. This is also a good opportunity to install any other roles or services you might be interested in.

Screen Shot 2015-05-14 at 1.53.02 PM

Click Here To Read The Entire Tutorial!