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Install OpenStack on One Virtual Machine, the Easy Way, On Ubuntu 16.04 LTS!

Many of you have emailed me or posted to voice your gripes about the painful process of installing an OpenStack environment to play around with. I feel your pain! My recent article on deploying OpenStack using conjure-up worked great until a developer committed some defective code.  Some of you even reverted to my old guide on deploying OpenStack on Ubuntu 14.04 from last year.  So, I set out to give you a fool proof, 100% guaranteed deployment method that’s EASY, STABLE, and works on Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial.  Here you go!

Requirements

 

For this guide, you will need a server at least as good as these specs.

  • Virtual Machine on a real hypervisor (ESXi, KVM, Xen, etc) or a bare metal server with virtualization support.
  • 14GB of RAM is the recommended minimum.
  • 100GB of hard disk space, at least.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS server, having already ran sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade
  • About an hour and a cup of coffee.

 

Installing OpenStack

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Secure Apache In No Time, For Free, With an SSL Certificate From Let’s Encrypt!

Recently, I found out about a non-profit organization called Let’s Encrypt, which came into existence earlier this year.  Let’s Encrypt is a publicly trusted certificate authority that issues FREE SSL certificates.  The SSL Certificates are fully functional and extremely easy to request and install.  In fact, using Let’s Encrypt, it only takes about a minute to request and install an SSL certificate on Apache via the Linux command line, using a few simple commands.  If you have a Linux server(s) running any sort of public facing web server, there is no reason not to do this right now.  Here’s how to do it on Ubuntu 16.04 (although it should be the same process on any version of Ubuntu)!

 

Prerequisites

To install an SSL certificate from Let’s encrypt using this guide, you will need a couple things.

  • A server running Ubuntu 16.04 (although this should work on any version of Ubuntu)
  • Apache installed with a domain name(s) that is resolvable to the IP of the server.
    • If you are hosting multiple domains, you will need to be sure you have Virtual Hosts configured that properly specify the ServerName variable.

 

Install the Let’s Encrypt Client

 

To make things easy, there is a client available, based on python, that will do all of the hard work for you.  The package is called python-letsencrypt-apache.  Let’s use Aptitude to install it.

 

#  sudo apt-get update

# sudo apt-get install python-letsencrypt-apache

 

The client is now installed and we can move on to setting up the SSL certificate.

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Configuring ownCloud 9 & Active Directory / LDAP Plugin Successfully

With this step-by-step guide, you will have your ownCloud 9 (and earlier) cloud server authenticating against Active Directory or LDAP correctly in no time!

Introduction

 

Recently, I went through the process of setting up a brand new ownCloud 9.1 server, after my previous ownCloud server had seen upgrades from 6.x all the way up to 8x.  If you’ve used ownCloud that long, you know the abundant changes and improvements that have been made along the way did not come without their growth pains; especially if you delved into encryption.  So, I decided to start fresh.  I use Active Directory to provide a centralized authentication source for everything in my personal “cloud,” so after setting up my new Dropbox clone, the first thing I needed to do was configure the LDAP user and group backend plugin.  I had a lot of problems getting the Active Directory usernames to match the ownCloud usernames, instead of showing a long string off numbers.  It was a lot of confusing UID, UUID, SAMAccountName and DN related confusion.  There aren’t any great guides to keep you from getting a headache, so I decided to make one.

 

Problems with the LDAP user and group backend plugin

 

It’s pretty straight forward to get an ownCloud server authenticating against and Active Directory server, but the biggest problem I’ve seen is the mapped usernames end up being long strings of numbers in ownCloud.  Although the display names are correct in owncloud, the actual username for all AD mapped logins, by default, are a long unique string makes things difficult.  For one, if you need to get to a users ownCloud data folder, there’s no intuitive way of knowing who’s is who’s folder from the command line.

With this step-by-step guide, you will have your ownCloud server authenticating against Active Directory / LDAP, with the following benefits:

 

  • The ownCloud username will match the Active Directory / LDAP username (no long incomprehensible string of numbers)
  • Any user added to a specified group created in Active Directory will automatically have ownCloud login privileges.
  • ownCloud users will be able to login using their username or email address (if specified in AD) interchangeably.

These three pluses make everything very seemless and saves a lot of headaches. So, lets get started.

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How to add a vLAN to a Cisco UCS using Unified Computing System Manager

Cisco’s UCS platform is an amazing blade infrastructure.  They are extremely reliable, very fast, and easily expanded.  Today, I’m going to briefly go over how to add a vLAN to your Cisco UCS setup, using the Cisco Unified Computing System Manager.  This guide assumes you have already configured the vLAN on your network and you have trunk-enabled ports being fed into your UCS and/or Fabric switches.

 

Go ahead and log into the Cisco UCS Manager.  Once you have logged in, select the LAN tab, then VLANs (in the left column).  Once there, click the New button, up at the top, and then Create VLANs.

 

For the VLAN Name/Prefix, give the VLAN a unique identifiable name.  In the VLAN IDs field, you need to enter to exact vLAN ID that was assigned to the vLAN when you configured it on your network infrastructure.  Once you have filled in those two fields, click OK.

 

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How to add a vLAN to VMware vSphere 5, 5.5, or 6, / ESXi virtual machine network

This is a simple step-by-step guide to adding / assigning a vLAN to a vSwitch virtual machine network on VMware ESXi and vSphere 5, 5.5, and 6.  Another way of putting it is adding a port group to a vSwitch.  It is a pretty straight forward process, but if you’ve never done it before it can be a little confusing.  We are going to create a Virtual Machine Port Group (network) that is assigned exclusively to a vLAN ID.  This guide assumes you have already created the vLAN on your switch and configured a trunk port to your virtualized infrastructure.

 

First, go ahead and log into the vSphere Client.  Once you have done so, navigate to Home > Inventory > Hosts and Clusters (if using vSphere).  If you are logging directly into an ESXi server, you should already be where you need to be immediately upon logging in.  Select your ESXi host in the left column, and then select the Configuration tab.  Once you are on the Configuration page, select Networking.  Select the Properties of the vSwitch you would like your vLAN to be assigned to.  In my case, I’m selecting the properties of vSwitch0.

 

2016-03-05 10_12_02-74.51.99.238 - vSphere Client

 

Now, we need to add a port group exclusive to the vLAN.  Click on Add.

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BYOC Series #1 – How to install Pydio on Ubuntu 14.04 – Your own private Dropbox clone

This is the first post in the “Build Your Own Cloud” series (BYOC) of guides. Each BYOC post will help you build the foundation of your own personal, private cloud. Today I’m setting my sights on Pydio. Pydio is an Open Source platform that mimics the functionality of Dropbox. There are a few Open Source Dropbox-clones out there, including OwnCloud, which I’ve written about in the past. Pydio is definitely more visually aesthetic than OwnCloud, and quite possibly even Dropbox. It’s also packed full of features. Some of Pydio’s key features include the following.

  • File Sharing – Web UI, Desktop Sync Client, & Mobile Apps
  • Web Access – Drag and drop files from your desktop, view & edit files online
  • Mobile Access – Native Android and iOS apps for phones and tablets
  • Flexible Backend Storage – Works with AWS, OpenStack, Samba, FTP, and even Dropbox
  • Directory Authentication – Will authenticate against LDAP, Active Directory, WordPress, Drupal, Google, and more
  • Very Secure – Supports Encryption as well as File & Folder ACLs
  • Compatible Platform – PHP-based & runs on LAMP or Windows IIS

It’s powerful enough to do everything Dropbox does, but you maintain control of your own data and personal information. You don’t have to pay a monthly fee to get large amounts of storage for you, or your company or even your family. Let’s get started.

Installing Pydio on Ubuntu 14.04

I’m installing Pydio on a virtual machine running Ubuntu 14.04, minimal server installation, with OpenSSH server running. First things first, let’s make sure everything is updated and upgraded.

#  sudo apt-get -y update
#  sudo apt-get -y upgrade

We need to add the debian package sources for Pydio to sources.list.

#  sudo nano /etc/apt/sources.list

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How to install GlusterFS + NFS on CentOS 7 for Virtual Machine Storage

GlusterFS is one of the fastest growing Open Source storage platforms in existence. It’s very simple to install, scale, and manage. What makes Gluster so amazing, is its ability to scale and replicate. It really sets the bar for software defined storage systems. It runs on whitebox hardware, or virtual machines. Lately, I’ve come across quite a few people that seem to be scared of Gluster and don’t know where to begin. I am here to help! Today, we’re going to install and configure GlusterFS on a CentOS 7 virtual machine; and, we’re going to make it NFS accessible for VM storage. Every hypervisor in existence supports NFS storage for virtual machines, including VMware ESXi / vSphere, Proxmox, Xen, KVM, oVirt, OpenStack, and all the others.

Installing GlusterFS Server and Client on CentOS 7 (two nodes)

I am using two virtual machines, each running CentOS 7. Their hostnames are gfs1 and gfs2. I have added a 40GB second disk to each VM that will be dedicated to GlusterFS. I suggest you have an identically sized second partition or drive on each of your systems as well.

As always, after connecting via SSH or console, go ahead and make sure everything is updated and upgraded on both nodes.

yum -y update

And, let’s go ahead and install a few useful packages (both nodes).

yum -y install nano net-tools wget

Edit the hosts file on both nodes. Make sure both nodes can resolve to each other via hostname.

nano /etc/hosts

Screen Shot 2015-06-03 at 1.44.35 PM

Now we can download and install Gluster (both nodes).

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