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How to Fix ‘setkeycodes 00’ and ‘Unknown key pressed’ Console Errors on OpenStack!

Earlier today, I wrote an updated tutorial on using devstack to install OpenStack on a single Ubuntu 16.04 server.  That deployment went so smooth it was no surprise when I ran into a roadblock when trying to console into my first instance.

 

The Problem

 

When accessing the console through the web browser, I wasn’t able to use the keyboard.  Every time I hit any key, these two lines would display in the console:

 

[ 74.003678] atkbd serio0: Use 'setkeycodes 00 <keycode>' to make it known.

[ 74.004462] atkbd serio0: Unknown key pressed (translated set 2, code 0x0 on isa0060/serio0).

 

use_setkeycodes_unknown_key_pressed_error_VNC_console_openstack

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Install OpenStack on One Virtual Machine, the Easy Way, On Ubuntu 16.04 LTS!

Many of you have emailed me or posted to voice your gripes about the painful process of installing an OpenStack environment to play around with. I feel your pain! My recent article on deploying OpenStack using conjure-up worked great until a developer committed some defective code.  Some of you even reverted to my old guide on deploying OpenStack on Ubuntu 14.04 from last year.  So, I set out to give you a fool proof, 100% guaranteed deployment method that’s EASY, STABLE, and works on Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial.  Here you go!

Requirements

 

For this guide, you will need a server at least as good as these specs.

  • Virtual Machine on a real hypervisor (ESXi, KVM, Xen, etc) or a bare metal server with virtualization support.
  • 14GB of RAM is the recommended minimum.
  • 100GB of hard disk space, at least.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS server, having already ran sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade
  • About an hour and a cup of coffee.

 

Installing OpenStack

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Secure Apache In No Time, For Free, With an SSL Certificate From Let’s Encrypt!

Recently, I found out about a non-profit organization called Let’s Encrypt, which came into existence earlier this year.  Let’s Encrypt is a publicly trusted certificate authority that issues FREE SSL certificates.  The SSL Certificates are fully functional and extremely easy to request and install.  In fact, using Let’s Encrypt, it only takes about a minute to request and install an SSL certificate on Apache via the Linux command line, using a few simple commands.  If you have a Linux server(s) running any sort of public facing web server, there is no reason not to do this right now.  Here’s how to do it on Ubuntu 16.04 (although it should be the same process on any version of Ubuntu)!

 

Prerequisites

To install an SSL certificate from Let’s encrypt using this guide, you will need a couple things.

  • A server running Ubuntu 16.04 (although this should work on any version of Ubuntu)
  • Apache installed with a domain name(s) that is resolvable to the IP of the server.
    • If you are hosting multiple domains, you will need to be sure you have Virtual Hosts configured that properly specify the ServerName variable.

 

Install the Let’s Encrypt Client

 

To make things easy, there is a client available, based on python, that will do all of the hard work for you.  The package is called python-letsencrypt-apache.  Let’s use Aptitude to install it.

 


#  sudo apt-get update

# sudo apt-get install python-letsencrypt-apache

 

The client is now installed and we can move on to setting up the SSL certificate.

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How to Create an iSCSI Target & Extent / Share on FreeNAS 9 (and previous versions)

Today, I’m going to guide you through the process of creating an iSCSI target / extent on FreeNAS-9. This will also work on previous versions of FreeNAS, such as version 7 and 8. There are a few different ways you can go about creating an iSCSI share. You can dedicate an entire device (Hard drive, or RAID array) to the iSCSI share, or you can simply create a Volume, and create multiple iSCSI shares and each is simply a file on the volume. This approach works well because you can use part of a volume as an NFS share, part of it as a CIFS share for Windows, and if you want a few separate iSCSI targets you can just create a single file for each. Lets get started.

How to create an iSCSI Target / Share on FreeNAS

 

First, we need to add a volume using your hard drive or RAID array that is connected to your FreeNAS server. If you have already done this, you can skip this step.  Let’s get started with the rest.

Log into your FreeNAS web interface, and go to Storage > Volumes > Volume Manager.  Fill in a volume name (make sure it starts with a letter, and NOT a number, otherwise you will get an error).  Add one or more of your Available Disks (by clicking the + sign).  Select a RAID type if you wish to do so.  In my case, I’m using hardware RAID, so I will leave the default (single drive stripe, IE, JBOD).  Now click Add Volume.

 

freenas-1

 

Now that we have added a volume, we can begin the process of creating an iSCSI share.  This process required multiple steps, in the following order:

  1. Add a Portal
  2. Add an Initiator
  3. Add a Target
  4. Create an Extent (the file that corrasponds to the iSCSI share)
  5. Link the Target and the Extent together
  6. Start the iSCSI service

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