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Install OpenStack on One Virtual Machine, the Easy Way, On Ubuntu 16.04 LTS!

Many of you have emailed me or posted to voice your gripes about the painful process of installing an OpenStack environment to play around with. I feel your pain! My recent article on deploying OpenStack using conjure-up worked great until a developer committed some defective code.  Some of you even reverted to my old guide on deploying OpenStack on Ubuntu 14.04 from last year.  So, I set out to give you a fool proof, 100% guaranteed deployment method that’s EASY, STABLE, and works on Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial.  Here you go!

Requirements

 

For this guide, you will need a server at least as good as these specs.

  • Virtual Machine on a real hypervisor (ESXi, KVM, Xen, etc) or a bare metal server with virtualization support.
  • 14GB of RAM is the recommended minimum.
  • 100GB of hard disk space, at least.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS server, having already ran sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade
  • About an hour and a cup of coffee.

 

Installing OpenStack

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How-To Install ownCloud 9 / 9.1 / 9.x on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS for the ULTIMATE, Private, Dropbox Clone

Introduction

 

Let’s face it, since the advent of Dropbox, Box, Google Drive and the bazillion other cloud-based file synchronization platforms that have came into existence over the past decade, it’s almost a necessity. For the road warrior, using multiple devices, or even the traditional white-collar worker, having access to all of your files no matter what device you’re using is extremely convenient and adds an enormous productivity boost to our lives. One of my biggest concerns with all of the third-party services, however, is privacy and security. Allowing another entity to store my sensitive data, and trusting they will keep in secure, is pretty scary. Thankfully, there are many options to roll-your-own cloud file synchronization and it really doesn’t take much horsepower on the server side. With a low cost VPS (virtual private server), retired computer at home, or even a $25 RaspberryPi, you can easily build your own Dropbox clone that will put you in control of your own data. Today, I’ll walk you through setting up ownCloud 9.1 on Cannocial’s Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. I will be setting up my cloud on a virtual machine running on VMware ESXi, but the process is very similar no matter what hardware platform you choose. This step-by-step guide assumes you have a plain, unmodified, minimum installation of Ubuntu Server 16.04 LTS, with only SSH access. If you don’t have SSH running, or don’t want to enable it, console access will work just fine. So, lets get started!

 

Installing Prerequisites (Apache/MySQL/PHP)

 

Go ahead and login to your freshly installed Ubuntu 16.04 server.  Be sure to login with a username that has sudoer privileges.  This can be the username you selected during installation or specified when you provisioned your VPS.  Let’s make sure everything is up-to-date before going any further. We will use Aptitude to do so.

 

#  sudo apt-get update

#  sudo apt-get upgrade -y

 

Now we can jump in to the nitty gritty.  There are a few standard prerequisites needed for ownCloud to run.  Most people refer to this as the LAMP stack (short for Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP).

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How to add a vLAN to VMware vSphere 5, 5.5, or 6, / ESXi virtual machine network

This is a simple step-by-step guide to adding / assigning a vLAN to a vSwitch virtual machine network on VMware ESXi and vSphere 5, 5.5, and 6.  Another way of putting it is adding a port group to a vSwitch.  It is a pretty straight forward process, but if you’ve never done it before it can be a little confusing.  We are going to create a Virtual Machine Port Group (network) that is assigned exclusively to a vLAN ID.  This guide assumes you have already created the vLAN on your switch and configured a trunk port to your virtualized infrastructure.

 

First, go ahead and log into the vSphere Client.  Once you have done so, navigate to Home > Inventory > Hosts and Clusters (if using vSphere).  If you are logging directly into an ESXi server, you should already be where you need to be immediately upon logging in.  Select your ESXi host in the left column, and then select the Configuration tab.  Once you are on the Configuration page, select Networking.  Select the Properties of the vSwitch you would like your vLAN to be assigned to.  In my case, I’m selecting the properties of vSwitch0.

 

2016-03-05 10_12_02-74.51.99.238 - vSphere Client

 

Now, we need to add a port group exclusive to the vLAN.  Click on Add.

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How to install GlusterFS + NFS on CentOS 7 for Virtual Machine Storage

GlusterFS is one of the fastest growing Open Source storage platforms in existence. It’s very simple to install, scale, and manage. What makes Gluster so amazing, is its ability to scale and replicate. It really sets the bar for software defined storage systems. It runs on whitebox hardware, or virtual machines. Lately, I’ve come across quite a few people that seem to be scared of Gluster and don’t know where to begin. I am here to help! Today, we’re going to install and configure GlusterFS on a CentOS 7 virtual machine; and, we’re going to make it NFS accessible for VM storage. Every hypervisor in existence supports NFS storage for virtual machines, including VMware ESXi / vSphere, Proxmox, Xen, KVM, oVirt, OpenStack, and all the others.

Installing GlusterFS Server and Client on CentOS 7 (two nodes)

I am using two virtual machines, each running CentOS 7. Their hostnames are gfs1 and gfs2. I have added a 40GB second disk to each VM that will be dedicated to GlusterFS. I suggest you have an identically sized second partition or drive on each of your systems as well.

As always, after connecting via SSH or console, go ahead and make sure everything is updated and upgraded on both nodes.

yum -y update

And, let’s go ahead and install a few useful packages (both nodes).

yum -y install nano net-tools wget

Edit the hosts file on both nodes. Make sure both nodes can resolve to each other via hostname.

nano /etc/hosts

Screen Shot 2015-06-03 at 1.44.35 PM

Now we can download and install Gluster (both nodes).

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How to install a nested hypervisor on an ESXi virtual machine without a vSphere server

If you read my blog, you’ve probably noticed I’ve been doing a lot of stuff with hypervisors lately, more specifically setting up OpenStack. I’ve always been a VMware guy. I like the simplicity of ESXi and the intuitiveness of of the interface. Since OpenStack really works best with at least 3 servers, 2 of which don’t do much of anything, I decided to use an ESXi server to install the openstack infrastructure. The controller node and network node do not provide any type of virtualization capabilities, but the compute node(s) do.

ESXi, at least since version 5.1, has supported running 64-bit hypervisor guests, or “nested” hypervisors on any Intel i3 or newer CPU. Specfically, your CPU needs to be one of the following:

  • Intel VT-x or AMD-V for 32-bit nested virtualization
  • Intel EPT or AMD RVI for 64-bit nested virtualizaiton

In my case, my Xeon W5580 has VT-x and EPT support, so I can run 64-bit nested virtual machines.

This will allow you to run any nested hypervisor within an ESXi 5.1 or newer host. I’ve ran Xen, KVM, OpenStack, Proxmox, and ESXi; they all worked great.

How To Enable

The feature, or setting, of the virtual machine that allows the VT-x functionality to be passed through to the guest virtual machine is called HV (as in hypervisor). The problem is you have to be running the new vSphere Web Client to get at the nice little check box to turn this on. The vSphere Desktop Client does not have this functionality and unless you have a license for vSphere server, there is no way to enable HV on a virtual machine using the GUI. However, there is a VERY easy work around for this. You simply add a single line to the .vmx file for the virtual machine you need HV enabled on.

To do this, fire up the vSphere Client, and make sure the host is selected in the left pane. Also, verify the VM is powered OFF.

Screen Shot 2015-04-27 at 5.55.35 PM

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